Procedure Descriptions

Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery)
Cataract Removal
Hernia Repair
Hysteroscopy
Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Laparoscopy
Pain Management Injection
Upper GI Series
YAG laser

Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery)

In Upper Eyelid Surgery, the surgeon first marks the individual lines and creases of the lids in order to keep the scars as invisible as possible along these natural folds. The incision is made, and excess fat, muscle, and loose skin are removed. Fine sutures are used to close the incisions, thereby minimizing the visibility of any scar.

In Lower Eyelid Surgery, the surgeon makes the incision in an inconspicuous site along the lashline and smile creases of the lower lid. Excess fat, muscle, and skin are then trimmed away before the incision is closed with fine sutures. Eyelid puffiness caused primarily by excess fat may be corrected by a transconjunctival blepharoplasty. The incision in this case is made inside the lower eyelid, and excess fatty material is removed. When sutures are used to close this kind of incision, they are invisible to the eye. They are also self-dissolving and leave no visible scar. Under normal conditions, blepharoplasty can take from one to two hours.

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Cataract Removal

Cataract Removal is a procedure to remove a clouded lens from the eyes to improve vision. This procedure often includes the implantation of an artificial lens.

With the help of a microscope, the surgeon will make a small incision at the junction of the clear and white outer parts of the eye. Depending on the type of cataract, the lens may be removed with suction and surgical instruments or with suction and a machine that uses high frequency sound waves to break up the lens. An artificial lens is usually inserted to help the eye focus. The incision maybe closed with fine stitches or it may be self sealing.

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Hernia Repair

A hernia develops when the outer layers of the abdominal wall weaken (or have a defect), bulge, and tear. The hole in this outer layer allows the inner lining of the abdomen to protrude and form a sac.

Laparoscopic Hernia Surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia. A telescope is attached to a camera is placed through a small opening under the belly button. Two more small cuts are made in the lower abdomen. The hernia defect is covered with a mesh and secured with stitches, staples, titanium tacks, or tissue glue.

Open Repair Surgery is the more traditional approach to Hernia treatment. Although there are many approaches, in a typical surgery, the protruding tissue is returned to the abdominal cavity and the sac that has been formed is removed. The surgeon repairs the hole in the abdominal wall by sewing strong surrounding muscle over the defect. Mesh may be used in place of sewing.

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Hysteroscopy

A hysteroscopy is an examination of the inside of the uterus using a fiber optic telescope which is inserted through the vagina and cervical canal. A hysteroscopy helps determine the presence of fibroids, polyps, scars or other abnormalities within the uterus.

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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder, a small, pear-shaped organ that lies on the underside of the liver, in the upper right portion of the abdomen.

The surgeon creates four very small incisions and will insert a special instrument called the laparoscope through one of the incisions. A laparoscope is a long, rigid tube that is attached to a tiny video camera and a light. Once the laparoscope has been inserted, the surgeon then guides the laparoscope while watching the view it provides on a video monitor.

The surgeon will use an electrocautery device to cut free the gallbladder. Once the gallbladder has been cut free, the surgeon collapses the organ and removes it through the incision at the navel.

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Laparoscopy

A Laparoscopy is a procedure to view abdominal organs or female reproductive organs. A laparoscope, a thin viewing tube similar to a telescope, is passed through a small incision (cut) in the abdomen. Using the laparoscope, the doctor can look directly at the outside of the abdominal organs or the uterus, ovaries and fallopian tubes.

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Pain Management Injection

The most common type of pain management procedure is an Epidural Steroid Injection or Spinal Epidural Injection. Prior to an epidural steroid injection, the patient's skin is cleaned with a sterilizing solution and a sterile drape is placed over the skin. Local anesthesia is injected into the skin to provide numbness at the injection site. The steroid injection consists of a local anesthetic and/or steroids. A small bandage may be placed over the injection site.

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Upper GI Series

The Upper Gastrointestinal Series uses x-rays to diagnose problems in the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and, in some cases, the small intestine. This procedure can show blockage, abnormal growth, ulcers, or a malfunction in the organ.

Before the procedure, the patient will drink a thick, white, milkshake-like liquid called Barium. This liquid coats the inside lining of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, so they can be clearly seen on x-rays. A physician will examine these x-rays for abnormalities.

With the assistance of a fluoroscope, the physician can also watch the digestive system work as the barium moves through it. This part of the procedures helps identify any problems in the digestive system's functions.

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YAG laser

The YAG laser is a surgical instrument that emits a short pulsed, high energy light beam that can be precisely focused by computer to cut, vaporize, or fragment tissue. The YAG laser is used to treat posterior capsular opacification, a clouding of the remaining capsular tissue that develops postoperatively in as many as half of cataract removal operations. The tissue is vaporized with carefully controlled pulses of the YAG laser, and the surgery is performed on an outpatient basis.

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